Classes
    1750 Crystal Drive, Arlington, VA | Ph: (703) 567-1290 | info@mindyourbodyoasis.com

Uncategorized

/Uncategorized

October Teacher of the Month

I am happy to introduce our newest teacher and also our October teacher of the month Kiki!

Hi, I’m Kiki and I’ve just moved to NOVA from Singapore. I am super grateful to have found a community of strong yogis at MYBO and love sharing the discipline of Hot Yoga with passionate practitioners.

I came to yoga as a way to stay fit with injuries from years of competitive tennis. When a friend first suggested some yoga postures to relieve my pain, I had no idea what the practice could become! I began working through asanas in my apartment while living in Thailand and used yoga to keep me grounded while I traveled SE Asia, eventually turned into a formal studio practice once I moved to Singapore. It was 2007 when I attended my first Hot Yoga class, then I never looked back!kiki-pic

Hot Yoga is perfect for beginners and I enjoy leading multi-level classes with options that make the practice accessible for every body. It was my first teacher, San Lai, who helped me to understand that yoga is anything & everything you make it- your responses to what happens on the mat is often a reflection of your habits in real life. A yoga practice doesn’t progress because the physical postures get any easier, eventually you have a better understanding of yourself (including your limitations) and life gets easier.

October 10th, 2016|Uncategorized|

September STUDENT of the Month Quynh Le

I am so happy to announce Quynh for September Student of the month. Quynh is growing stronger in her practice everyday and I look forward to seeing her as a teacher someday.

Tell us a little about yourself! What does your 9-5 look like? Where are you from? What are your hobbies? What are you passionate about?
During the day when I don’t sweat in the hot yoga room at MYBO, I am an IT Business Analyst. I help build websites, mobile apps, and do all things technology. I love solving problems! Originally, I’m from Viet Nam. I moved to the US 6 years ago for my undergraduate studies at a university in Texas. I then startequynhd working and before I knew it I got married to an awesome man with an unusually loving family. When I have some free time I like to go on Pinterest looking for DIY recipes of all kinds; reading on my Kindle, hiking, biking, and needless to say, practicing yoga everywhere I go – my husband laughs at me every time!

How long have you been practicing yoga? What made you try yoga for the first time?
I started practicing yoga from the summer of 2014 at my home through watching YouTube videos. My first thought about yoga is it could help me reflect and learn more about myself. I spent a lot of time finding answers about the outside world but I never really stopped and had a conversation with myself or even learn to love it. I also needed some type of activity that will get my body to feel good again. I used to run and play tennis with my friends in college but for some reason I just stopped doing it when I started my professional job and clearly my body was not happy with that.

What is your motivation to practice yoga regularly? What is the biggest physical and/or mental benefit you have noticed from doing yoga?
When I used to practice at home it used to be very intermittent. MYBO makes it so easy to be dedicated to my yoga practice. In fact, on some rough days it’s what I look forward to the most. It’s my sacred time set aside only for myself to look within, let go, and then feel brand new again. I think what motivates me the most is that I see the changes in my mind, my body, and my overall being. I am now more attentive to myself and to others. I’m also calmer than I used to be. I also think I smile more! I want to continue on the journey of self-love and self-discipline and yoga helps me do just that.quynh2

I bet a lot of people can feel awesome just practicing yoga every day. But what’s special is I get to do all that within a community that is absolutely supportive and kind. Through this sharing I want to give a shout out to the MYBO staff and community for making it a place of love like no others. It really is something special. I can’t wait to join the teach training at MYBO and give back the same way the staff and teachers are giving me!

Namaste.
Quynh

September 7th, 2016|Uncategorized|

September TEACHER of the Month Alyona

I am so pleased to announce September’s teacher of the month,Alyona Richie. Alonya is a fun,free spirited teacher who can also be tough. I always love seeing the look of the students faces coming out of one of her pilates classes, you know they just had an awesome workout. Thanks Alyona for being a great teacher!

Tell us a little about yourself! Where are you from? What are your hobbies?
I am originally from Russia and moved to the US in 1996. I came to DC in 2004 and loved it right away. It is such a great place to be and every day I feel so lucky to live here. I love anything to do with being outside and being active and the DC area has a lot to offer. My passion is running. I started running later in college. I wish it was soon
er so now I am trying to catch up on the years that I did not run 🙂 . I also love biking, stand up paddle boarding, yoga, Pilates.Alyona pic 2
How many years have you been teaching yoga?
I have been teaching yoga for about 1.5 years now. Prior to that, I have been teaching Pilates for about 6 years.

What is your favorite style to teach?
I love teaching Hot Hatha the most. I think this is such a disciplined and challenging style not just for the practitioner but also for the teacher. The sequence for the poses is routine, so as a teacher I work on making the class different every time I teach it which is challenging and exciting for me.

What made you want to become a yoga teacher?
I love practicing yoga. I saw the physical changes that yoga did for me. However, I also started seeing the changes in my mental state and I wanted to learn more about other aspects of yoga, such as meditation, and find out what else is out there that I may be missing out.

What is your advice to someone considering becoming a yoga teacher?
If you are considering it, then you should definitely do it. Do not hesitate because you will be glad you did it. It is a lot work and you will learn a lot in the process and it will transform your life for the better.

What is your favorite part of teaching at MYBO?
I have a great boss :). Also, the studio is very welcoming and the space is beautiful. It is also a great community where you get to meet a lot of people who share the same passion and that way make some great new friends.alyona pic
~Alyona

September 7th, 2016|Uncategorized|

Meet August Teacher Of the Month Moriah Childers

Tell us a little about yourself! Where are you from? What are your hobbies?

I’m from DC! I was born at the old Walter Reed National Med Center that was on Georgia Ave. I’m an Army brat, so I moved around a lot as a kid, but by the time I hit middle school, we had settled in the DC area. My hobbies are YOGA (of course), but also listening to and making music, dance, drawing, hiking and reading–especially outside on a nice day.

How many years have you been teaching yoga/ What is your favorite style to teach?

August will mark my 2nd year anniversary teaching! My favorite style to teach is playful Vinyasa, though I love teaching restorative classes too; you may find a few of those poses slipped in to wind a powerful sweaty class down.

Moriah pic

What made you want to become a yoga teacher?

I wanted to become a yoga teacher because I realized I was more passionate and interested in yoga the hobby than other directions I could go after graduation. I began noticing larger themes in practice and theory and wanted to have the time/effort resources to really dedicate myself to investigating those themes as well as sharing them and understanding them through the bodies of others.

What is your advice to someone considering becoming a yoga teacher?

My advice to a potential new teacher is that YOUR practice, especially at the teaching point has to be number one. It’s for you as much as your students; it’s the first thing to go, but the most important to maintain.

What is your favorite part of teaching at MYBO?

My favorite part of teaching at MYBO is the open environment of students and staff! If you’re looking for your authentic self, MYBO is the safe haven where it may be hiding!

~Moriah Childers

August 15th, 2016|Uncategorized|

August Student of the Month Emily Holland

 

I’m very excited to introduce our new student of the month for August Emily Holland. Emily has been with MYBO since May of 2016 and is getting stronger with every class/practice she completes. ~kam

Emily Holland pic

Tell us a little about yourself! What does your 9-5 look like? Where are you from? What are your hobbies? What are you passionate about?

I’m an Account Executive for a company that sells educational software to guidance counselors.  The software helps students make sure they are making the best choices for their college or jobs after graduating.  I work in Arlington and I love the 10 minute commute.  Being new to the area, I’m really enjoying getting to know Arlington and Washington, DC better.  I am passionate about travel, my dog, my family and friends and finding a way to make a difference in the world.

How long have you been practicing yoga? What made you try yoga for the first time?

I’ve been attending yoga classes on and off for about eight years, but I would say that I only really began to practice/ make yoga a part of my life since May, when I began at MYBO.  I was brought to yoga classes originally by a friend, who used yoga as her primary form of exercise and then a year later by a friend using it as a healing mechanism after a break up.  I always had difficulty focusing on the practice and not making a list of what to do when I left class.  With hot hatha, everything just clicked for me and I’ve been coming 3-4 times a week since May.

What is your motivation to practice yoga regularly? What is the biggest physical and/or mental benefit you have noticed from doing yoga?

Originally, my lower back was hurting me.  I also had a shoulder injury from a car accident that would be very tight.  I came to help stretch out those injuries.  Not only have those issues lessened, but I’ve noticed other chronic aches and pains going away as well.  Mentally, the heat actually helps me still my mind and focus on my practice.  I find myself more at peace and significantly more flexible than I was before.  My quads especially are finally opening up.  I’m looking forward to being in floor bow soon!

What do you love most about MYBO?

I love the people!  It’s a great group of instructors and clients.  I love the full services offered and the big space.  Not having to bump arms with someone while stretching is a huge perk, especially hemily holland pic 2ere in the Arlington/ DC area.

Thanks again for thinking of me!

August 8th, 2016|Uncategorized|

Sun Set Meditation

Sunset Walking Meditation
Walking meditation can be just as prsky_sunset_nature_216079ofound as sitting meditation, and has the advantage of bringing the meditative experience into our activity. It allows you to be more present in your body and in the present moment.

There is a tremendous richness of experience to become aware of as you walk. The body loves movement, and will reward you with pleasure if you pay attention to how it feels! So much of the time we are caught up in our mental worlds — thinking of the past or future, planning, imagining… Paying attention to the body as you walk will help you to enjoy simply being alive. (Although there are sitting meditations in which you pay attention to the body, it is easier to do so when the body is in motion. This is another advantage of walking meditation.)

We will do this walk with Amanda guiding us outside amongst the sounds of nature and our city. At the end we will commune with some delicious fruit and healthy beverages.

8/19 7-8:30

8/31 7:15-8:30

$35 ($15 of which is contributed to the Honduran Orphanage Service Retreat in February-see Retreats)

August 8th, 2016|Uncategorized|

Bees at Crack of Dawn Trying to Grow Good Food by Dawn Olson

 

Hive door swings opens and out the forager girl struts looking for the latest fashion buzz (bad pun) in pollen and nectar.  “Say, does this pollen make my legs look big…good!”  She grins.  Lots of articles in the news about our friends the honey bees, therefore it was decidebees3d by the blog committee (me) to dedicate an entire blog to these girls.  So grab a cup of tea, sweeten it with honey and read on.  You want good food, you must have bees, the ultimate “friends with benefits,” arrangement.  “Pollinate me!  No, me first!  Look how pretty I am.  Pick me, Pick me!” scream the flowers to the bees, okay we know plants don’t actually scream, but they do release delightful scents and are shameless in wanting bees.  Sounds familiar, wild women!?

When temperatures reach 50 degrees, forager bees send out a small reconnaissance teams to look for a flowing plant with a flat landing surface and plenty of pollen or nectar.  Once discovered, they fly back to the hive, do the waggle I like that word) dance of directions to the food source.  It is believe all directions are oriented to the sun.  Then, the rest of the foragers follow those directions, of course they do, they’re girls.  Honey bees have short tongues and short tempers if you mess with their hive.  Therefore, they pick flowers that are easy to land on and easier to get pollen and nectar from.  Bumble bees, on the other hand, are the linebackers of the bees and they just toss and tumble into a flower getting the pollen all over their hair…Eew, back hair, I digress.

Our beautiful bees are in trouble with populations declining at an alarming rate.  What gives and who is responsible?  “Not I,” say the developers destroying their entire habitat; “Not I,” say the farmers growing mono crops; “Not I,” say the pesticide companies with their poisons.  Looks like another job for women to save the bees.  “Why I?’ say you, because one in every three bites of food is from a plant visited by pollinators like bees.  It is fair to say bees are absolutely critical to our food supply and food is essential to our survival.  Basically, humans live because bees live!  Enough said.

 

Let’s solve the problem.  Wait for it…another trilogy:  Feed, protect, and shop.  Bees can be saved if we will simply feed them.  As  you  know, bees forage for pollen and nectar from plants that bloom…like flowers, trees, grasses, vegetables, shrubs, and even cactus.  Go native baby and rethink about that water sucking, chemical addicting, work demanding, nobody appreciates it, lawn of yours.  Plant gardens that bees will love as much as people do!  If you need help, check out The Bee Smart™ Pollinator Gardener, a comprehensive guidebook to selecting plants for bees specific to any area.  Plants to consider in the Texas area include: moon flower Salvia, Primrose, Echinacea, Cardinal Flower, Larkspur, Indian Paintbrush, Sunflower, Prairie Clover, and Texas Redbud just to name a few.  Invest in native flowers as they give you the best bang for your buck.  Highly hybridize ornamental flowers do not have much pollen or nectar because they are bred to look good, not reproduce.  Wildflowers should be planted along fence rows, roadsides, in public places, and in planters in town.  Cover crops like clover, hairy vetch, or cow peas can be used to offer a gbees 1reat buffet for bees, especially when flowers are dormant.  If the owners of every ranch, yard, piece of idle land, and business would dedicate some landscape to bees, Texas bees could be saved and, as a side note, butterflies, too.

Once the bees are nourished, they must be protected.  No need to send in the National Guard, but bees need safe places to live with clean water and air, just like us. The use of pesticides and other chemicals must be kept to an absolute minimum (of course we would advocate NONE, ZERO, NADA)…especially on the flowers that bees frequently visit.  Do not, under any circumstance, no way, no how, buy a plant treated with neonicotinoids and for crying out loud, do not use it yourself.  Like nicotine, it acts on receptors of the nerve synapse.  I know you have not forgot what we learned earlier, whatever the plant absorbs, you and your family absorb and now we know Smokin’ Joe is not only toxic to you, it impacts the bees’ navigation system interfering with their ability to find their hive.  The girl with the groceries cannot find her house (hive), guess what happens—it starves to death.

bees 2

 

 

 

Nesting habitats also need to be increased.  But not all bees are honey bees. There are many native Texas bees that do not live in colonies (and they don’t sting as often because they don’t have a hive to protect).  These are called solitary bees.  They often live in the ground or in dead trees.  To encourage solitary bees, the gardener needs to provide sunny, well-drained patches of bare ground.  Keeping some portion of a flower bed free of mulch, exposing the soil, is a quick and easy way to provide habitat for ground-nesting bees.  A lack of deadwood can be addressed by installing nest blocks…boxes that shed water and are filled with paper tubes in which the bees can deposit eggs.

 

Finally, get on your shopping shoes and demand and buy local honey.  If women create a bigger market for local honey, more people might raise honey bees, thus increasing their population.  This is an opportunity for small local businesses and for you to spend money on local folks growing good food.  If you are still curious about bees, check out Texasbeekeeper.org; txbeeguild.org; or watch Marla Spivak TED talk.

 

Recommended Reading:

 

The Bees:  A Novel by Laline Paull   Flora 717 is a sanitation worker, a member of the lowest caste in her orchard hive where work and sacrifice are the highest virtues and worship of the beloved Queen the only religion. But Flora is not like other bees.

 

August 4th, 2016|Uncategorized|

MYBO RETREAT IN HONDURAS

Seva yoga retreat in Honduras, February 18-24, 2017

 

Please join us for a an exciting and fulfilling week of yoga and service in Honduras. We will be serving at a ranch where orphaned and disadvantaged infants, children, and young adults are able to grow up in a supportive and caring environment. NPH (www.nph.org) provides a home, community and education for hundreds of children in nine countries. honduras pic

Service opportunities on the ranch include:Helping the caregivers with the infants,Working in the garden or in other parts of the ranch ,Assisting with meal prep in the kitchen ,Teaching the children and young adults yoga or playing games/sports or other creative activities.

 

 

 

 

The retreat price of $599 includes:

All meals

Shared accommodations on the ranch in volunteer housing 2-3 persons per room and shared bathroom

Transport to/from airport as a group

Daily morning outdoor vinyasa yoga classes and evening restorative/yin classes

The retreat price does not include airfare to/from Tegucigalpa and travel insurance.

Please note we will fly as a group on the same flight from Miami to Tegucigalpa. More details to come.

Space is limited to no more than 15 participants, so sign up soon! Any questions, please contact: bobbiejotraut@gmail.com

 

August 3rd, 2016|Uncategorized|

DAY 1: A Shamanic Meditative Journey; DAY 2: : Sufi Breath: An Ancient Transcendental Breathwork

Mind Your Body Oasis is excited to announce that we have a special guest coming to our Center to host a powerful 2 Day Transformational Shamanic Workshop. You have the option to come to one or both days and we are pleased to be offering our guests a reduced donation for joining us for the complete workshop.

ABOUT OMAR AHMADZAI
Omar Ahmadzai is a Mystic and Ayahuasquero who like many of us has spent a lifetime searching for the deeper meaning of existence. He is the Director of Speakers at the Universal TheoGnostic Society, an International Non-Pro t Civil Society, and the Director of The Shamanic Healing Center located in Portalon, Costa Rica. He resides in Miami Beach FL and at our Center in Costa Rica.
He travels the world speaking on behalf of Humanity, Spirituality, and Ancient Mysticism including Shamanic “Tools of Divination” that include ancient meditation techniques and plant- based medicines that have been used by the Mystics and Sages of all ages.

Omar’s book, “Journey In Spirit: The Art of Awakening” is being released in the summer of 2016.

day2
Day 1 – A Shamanic Meditative Journey
Drawing from various ancient traditions of mysticism, this guided meditation will bring you into a timeless journey in spirit through vibration and sacred breath.
As spiritual beings our universal language is Vibration, and this form of communication cannot be taught it can only be experienced. Vibration is beyond time and space and within our Innerverse is alchemically opened; we enter into new familiar understanding of that which has always existed.
This Shamanic Meditation will bring many ancient vibrations together with the use of Shamanic Tools such as crystal bowls, Native American Flutes, the Chakapa from the Rainforests of Peru, to sacred drums from the Middle East in a precise symbiotic.
Sacred breath is used symbiotically with rhythmic beats and mantra creating a focused transcendental state of exploration within the deepest dimensions of your Inner Verse.
Through the creation of these vibrations our ancient memory is awakened, our connection to our cosmic ancestry is understood, and karma is shaken and then removed, providing the space for new beginnings.
Coming out of our Shamanic Journey all are open to share from their personal experience and an open format Q&A is held to reflect and expand on all subjections pertaining to Spirituality and the process of Awakening.

 

Day 2: Sufi Breath: An Ancient Transcendental Breathwork
Our breath is our Essence; it is our connection to the divine within. With proper cultivation, our breath transforms into a river of consciousness, flowing through us, activating our chakras and delving us deeper into a higher state of existence. On this day we will build off of the work from the previous day and dive deeper into this vibrational experience with the addition of longer Holotropic Breathwork and deeper patterns of sound created by various ancient shamanic tools such as the rattles and Chakapa from the rainforests of Peru to the flutes and hand drums of the Native Americans and many others.
Coming out of our Transcendental Journey all are open to share from their personal experience and an open format Q&A is held to reflect and expand on all subjections pertaining to Spirituality and the process of Awakening.

Day 1

PROGRAM OUTLINE:

Day 1: 7pm-9:30pm
Introduction Into Shamanic Meditation (30 mins)
Shamanic Meditation (1hr)
Limpia (Shamanic Energy Bath/Cleanse) (30 mins)
Q&A: 1 hour

Day 2 (2-3 hrs), Saturday Start 11am-?
Event includes:
Introduction
Introduction to Sufi Breath and Mysticism (30 mins)
Sufi Breath: A Holotropic Breathwork (1-1.5hr)
Limpia (Shamanic Energy Bath/Cleanse) (30 Mins)
Open Floor Q&A: (1 hr +)

Listen to Omar playing flute at a workshop:
https://soundcloud.com/shamaniccenter/shamanic-meditation

Reservations:
$55 each workshop ($90 for both) paid via PayPal or venmo to amanda@mindyourbodyoasis.com

 

July 16th, 2016|Uncategorized|

Back Up at the Crack of Dawn Growing Good Food by Dawn Olson

IT’S ALIVE!!  No, not Frankenstein silly, the soil.  Let’s learn about the wonderful underworld of this planet’s greatest resource (beside women).  Topsoil, dirt, loam, ground, and Earth (Wind and Fire, I couldn’t resist) are the medians in which plants live and thrive.  It’s in this deep dark space where lurking just below the earth’s surface we discover the secrets of growing good food.  Besides the usual worms, bugs, insects, and bees, (yes, bees live underground, we’ll explore them later), living soil contains microorganisms.  Translation—teeny tiny creatures that live on other living or decomposing matter.  Important point of order here, even dead matter supports life.  So let’s get this straight, soil is alive for plant growth and when it’s rotting, how can that be?  Read on Alice!

Fungi called mycorrhizae (my-cor-rhi-zee) or (my crow rises) and plants enter into a “friends with benefits” relationship.  Plants agreed to let these fungi hang-out on its roots, the fungi agreed to act as hair extensions, improving roots’ reach 100-fold.  If your mind is not blow yet, check this out.  These filaments called fungus roots actually help plants communicate with one another faster than twitter.

mycorrhizae

 

SAY WHAT!!  Plants talk?  That’s like asking if women gossip…we deny it, but you know we do.  Alright, before I go all Avatar on you, plants actually release chemicals when they are under stress (can you say, “B.O.”).  Then these chemicals get detected by other plants and this warning allows them to put up defensive shields for incoming diseases and pests alike.  Why is this important you ask…because, if given a chance most plants (like women) are designed to fend for themselves.  They do not need our chemicals to live and thrive.  If you want to grow good food, most of your effort should be in the building of healthy soil.

 

Like the Fifty Shades trilogy, healthy soil is comprised of three things:  air, organic matter, and rock minerals.  Plants need air because roots actually breathe, hence why plants die when overwatered, they basically drown.  First safety tip, overwatering is bad.  The ground goes anaerobic, (no oxygen), roots rot then die, followed closely by the plant.  I digress.  Back to the trilogy of soil, since you can’t buy bag-o-air, how does one put air into the soil?  Why, you just work the soil with lots of organic matter and rock minerals.  See how easy this is?  Pssst, that’s how Mother Nature does it.  Through erosion, rocks get ground down to minerals and debris decomposes into organic matter.  Then, ta-da dark, rich soil forms in which new flora and fauna spring forth.  There you have it, the circle of life!

Well, we are not getting any younger here so we can’t wait for rocks and debris to decompose. fungi2

I get that, so you can either make or buy compost, there is your bag-o-organic matter.  And you can also buy bag-o-minerals such as lava or green sand.  Now, these two get mixed into the existing soil and it will not only aerate the soil, but jump start the “friends with benefits,” arrangement.  However, always a however, if using store bought compost, it is probably sterile, so you’ll need something to stimulate and excite the fungi, they are easily excited.  Like most kids today, fungi and bacteria love sugar.  They feed on the kind of sugar found in dry molasses or diluted liquid molasses, yes like the one that goes in pecan pie.  Iver makes the best pecan pie, yum…I digress, again.

Here is an award-winning, life-giving, good-food grow’n recipe for luscious (like that word) soil:

Open a bottle of wine and let it breathe.

For every 100 sq. feet (10’x10’) of existing soil add:

5 cups of mineral rock

5 bags of compost

Get your man or some young kid to mix and stir, a lot.  Yes, he can fire up the tiller and go like crazy, but only do this once when you first start a garden.  Otherwise, you will pulverize all those micros that you have worked so hard to establish.  Then pour yourself a nice tall glass of wine, swirl gently as you water the mixture thoroughly.  With a garden hose in one hand and your drink in the other, strike a pose and toast the brilliance of Mother Nature and yourself.  You, sister, have just created soil.

So, let’s review for those of you who have slept since the last blog.  I convinced you by wit and dazzling blogging to grow or seek out good food.  In this writing, you were wowed by the “Oh, so easy” way of making soil.  Next month we shall “Release the Kraken!”  This feat is achieved by the magic of transforming garbage into compost, compost into tea, and tea into organic fertilizer.  How exciting!!!

Check out Mother Nature’s wicked sense of humor:  Fungi boobs and weiners in the garden.

fungifungi weiner

 

July 6th, 2016|Uncategorized|